The 13th Floor

VIDEO: A Tribute To The Long Lost Horrors Uncovered On VHS!

Like most movie lovers, there was no better feeling than being able to purchase and own a movie you loved to add to your video collection. The evolution of the VHS era eventually made it not too far fetched to seek out and build your own home library that would rival that of any local video store. As the times and formats changed, I changed my collecting habits with them.

Even though I currently focus on Blu-Ray’s as my main physical media preference, I love and have tremendous respect for the VHS format. A few things recently rekindled that admiration. For starters, there are a handful of documentaries out there that focus on people who still buy and celebrate home video cassettes. Highly recommended viewing? Check out REWIND THIS and ADJUST YOUR TRACKING.


But also, I was recently gifted with the book VHS VIDEO COVER ART by Thomas Hodge and immediately fell in love with it. Something in his introduction really struck a chord with me. Something we’ve lost with these modern forms of seeking out new movies to watch.

To paraphrase, he basically said one of the main reasons we all have fond memories of physically stepping into a video store is because the second you walked through those doors, you were surrounded by art. You can look at it as metaphoric, or literal. It didn’t matter if you were a big budget Hollywood studio film, or a low budget indie horror flick. What would win us over is that cover art. And just the idea of being surrounded by tons of creative work was something I found inspiring, even if I didn’t realize it at the time.

So, I decided to draft up a video for you guys. In it, I show off the above mentioned docs, I skim through the VHS VIDEO COVER ART book, and I pull out some of my VHS gems, primarily movies that are not available in any other format, which is why I held onto them. Have a look!

And just to reiterate, I love this book and wanted to show off a few random pages. Have a peek below!

What do some of your VHS collections look like? What are some of the gems in your home video library? Comment with the goods below!

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